Oakley unveils new EVZero frameless replica sunglasses

— Oakley removes the frame for an unobstructed view of the road ahead

oakley-evzero

Last year Oakley released the bold new Jawbreaker replica sunglasses, and now the US company has followed them up with the launch of these new EVZero frameless glasses.

The best thing about the Jawbreaker glasses is that the top of the frame is pushed higher up so it doesn’t obscure your vision as much as the frame on regular replica sunglasses. The new EVZero look to take this idea a step further. They do away with the frame completely, which should offer even less vision obstruction, particularly when riding in the drops in an aggressive head-down position.

oakley-evzero-1

“Built for speed and engineered to be the ultimate multi-sport sunglass for training, running and beyond, EVZero™ Path is Oakley’s lightest performance frame and features a toric shield of Plutonite in a rimless design for an unobstructed view,” says Oakley Outlet.

oakley-evzero-2

Oakley of course isn’t the first company do offer frameless eyewear and there have been plenty of other examples over the years. I remember Specialized doing some frameless glasses way back in 2006 that weighed just 16g and were great for racing. And there are many more recent examples.

The lack of a frame not only benefits vision but the weight on the scales as well. They weigh a claimed 22g with the Path lens. A larger Range lens increases the weight to 24g. For comparison, the Jawbreaker come in at 60g, so that’s a significant weight saving.

oakley-evzero-3

Being able to change lenses is a key part of the current RadarLock and Jawbreaker models, but it’s not clear if the new EVZero allows lenses to be changed. That lack of any mention of lens changing suggests it’s not something that is possible with this new product.

The new EVZero glasses are priced from £11-17 depending on the lens. The latest Path Prizm Road lens version costs £14. More at http://www.fakeoakleysunglasses.co.uk

Buying Cheap Ray Bans? Don’t fall for scam on Facebook

rayban-scam-facebook
Crooks are luring social network users to visit bogus Ray Ban outlet store and buy heavily discounted sunglasses there. Victims’ payment card details are at risk.

Beware of Ray Ban ads on Facebook.

Crooks are luring social network users to visit bogus cheap Ray Ban store to buy ‘heavily discounted’ sunglasses, but their main intention is to steal their personal and payment information.

Sounding the alert, ESET, a company dealing in cybersecurity solutions, said the Facebook scam targets Chinese language users of the popular social networking website.

The company said in a media statement: “Spam ads, promoting fake Ray Ban sunglasses with discounts as high as 90 per cent, are spread via hacked Facebook accounts that attackers have taken control of using malware and social engineering tactics. Subsequently, attackers post pictures and ads via individual Facebook accounts without the owner’s consent.

“Victims that fall for the scam and click on these ads are taken to fraudulent websites where they can make a purchase.”

Besides the possibility of losing money on counterfeit goods, the victims’ payment card details may also be at risk as the transactions run via bogus sites rather than secure payment portals.

This allows their credit card details to travel unencrypted across the Internet before being sent to the attacker’s server in plain text, thus allowing them to use these details in the future.

ESET said the fraudulent websites are available in different language mutations, notably Chinese and English. However, users in countries such as the Slovak Republic, the Czech Republic, Chile, France, Spain, and the United Kingdom are also targeted.

Most of these fraudulent websites are also situated in China and use a similar design, according to ESET. Many of them are newly-created domains registered only this year, showing that the scam is still very prevalent, despite being around for a number of years.

More details about the scam, as well as ESET’s recommendations on how to avoid falling victim to it, can be found in an article on ESET’s official blog,CheapOakleyOutlet.co.uk.